How many people use lyft

How to Use Uber & Lyft to Find Local Drivers on Demand In Your Local Areas

Demand drivers are becoming increasingly common worldwide. Here we tell you all you need to know about these services that are shaking the public transport industry.

Gone are the days of standing on a street corner and waving your hand in the air to get the attention of a taxi driver in an old smelly car. For many inhabitants of large cities, getting a driver is as simple as using your smart phone to open up an application and your car and driver will arrive shortly after.

City Transportation Evolves

Look around in any major city and you’ll see drivers everywhere, but now some of these drivers are offering a unique service using the new apps Uber & Lyft which are almost as ubiquitous as taxis and in a short period of time have almost completely eclipsed the taxi industry.

These services have been established in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Phoenix and Miami and are rapidly expanding in new parts of the US as well as over seas internationally. This guide aims to explain how to use Lyft and Uber, especially for those who have not yet taken their first ride.

Ride sharing services were born of a desire to create an alternative transportation method to taxis. In San Francisco which was the birthplace of these services it can be very difficult to catch a taxi on the street, especially in the city center and if it is raining out in San Francisco you can expect the phone numbers to major taxi companies to have a busy signal for hours.

Uber services are similar to Lyft and Uber came first in this space paving the way for the copy cat company Lyft to join the space. These services no longer imply that you share a ride with another person such as in a carpool type situation, arriving at the same destination together.

Instead, these applications are best described as drivers on demand services, where a car is requested from an application on a phone and you pay the driver for his services using the same app you used to get the driver. In this guide we will be discussing how to use Uber & Lyft services to request a car or SUV ride.

Who Are the Major Players?

There are two applications called drivers to dominate the scene: Uber and Lyft. Both have existed for several years. Uber started around 2009 and Lyft was launched in 2012. Both have applications for Android and iOS, while only Uber is an app for Windows Phone.

Launched in 2012, Sidecar has become the third most popular choice, but the CEO of the company has said it will soon cease to carry passengers to focus solely on home delivery. For that reason, I will not cover here.

These applications are different from those you use to call a professional taxi, as and Flywheel, Hailo or Gett (although Uber provides a similar option in some cities). These applications connect you to a licensed taxi service as you would take in the traditional way on the street.

How Does Uber rides & Lyft Rides Work?

When you need a car, you open one of these applications and follow the instructions on the screen to start. With each application, you’ll see a map of your current location, as determined by your phone, and real-time animation of the cars nearby.

Once you apply for a car and optionally entering your destination, the application will contact drivers available nearby. When a driver in the enterprise system accepts the ride, you will see your profile, including your name, a photo, make and model of your car, a photo of the car, and their approximate arrival time in minutes.

Drivers are calling or texting when they arrive and when you see the car, you just get into it. During the trip, you can see your way in the application, but will not see a meter as in a traditional taxi. In most cases, you will not see the final cost until the end of the trip.

Then you’ll use the application to give feedback to the driver, add an optional tip (Lyft only), and submit your payment. If you do not pay immediately, the application will charge after a certain time, usually several hours or a day. Uber also allows you to split the cost of travel between several people, for a fee of 25 cents.


How Much Can You Make Driving For Lyft and Uber in OC/LA?

How many people use lyftThis post originally appeared on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast but since rideshare driving can be a great second source of income I thought it would be a great article to post since the number one question I get from people is: How Much Can You Make Driving for Lyft and Uber? I drive in Orange County (OC) (and sometimes in Los Angeles (LA)) so these are my experiences driving there but I wouldn’t say there’s any monumental difference compared to other cities although you do definitely make more in the bigger cities.

  • Sign up to drive with Uber and get up to $500 depending on the city! (referral link)
  • Get $20 off your first Uber ride when you sign up as a passenger.

How Much Can You Make Driving For Lyft and Uber in OC/LA?

Even though I’m now a registered Uber and Lyft driver I haven’t had much time to drive for both platforms at the same time. I wrote about my first weekend doing both a couple weeks ago and the rides were overwhelmingly Uber. Even though I’m a part time driver, I really don’t have any set times that I like to drive though. I kind of just head out whenever I feel like it or whenever I’m bored.

With that being said, I decided that I was ready to try out my first full Saturday night driving for both Lyft and Uber. It was actually my first full Saturday night in general ever since I normally do other things on Saturday nights. But here in Orange County, Friday nights are usually a little bit slow. I haven’t had much luck making the big bucks on a Friday night but it seems like Saturday nights are always heading towards surge or Primetime around 11 pm up until around 2 or 3 am.

It’s a little hard to keep track of all your rides while you’re driving but I usually take an in-depth look at my statistics using Sherpa and some of my own calculations the next day. The best thing about driving part-time is that you can really cherry pick your hours. I usually turn on Lyft and Uber at my house and if it’s slow, I might postpone going out until it gets busier.

And that’s exactly what happened on this night, I checked in around 7 pm and then again at 8 pm and there were still tons of drivers out. I went into driver mode for a while but didn’t get any requests within a few minutes so I figured it would be better to wait until later.

9:24 pm – First Uber Ride: 1.36 miles, 5 minutes, $5.75, 9:33 pm – 9:38 pm

I usually like starting off the night from my house with a Lyft request since after Uber’s cut, Lyft driver pay is actually higher right now. But after about 10 minutes of no requests, I decided I’d rather have an Uber ride than no ride at all. Your first ride is also when you should reset your trip odometer on your car so that you’ll know how many total miles you drove for the night. I actually forgot to do this but I’ll show you guys a good quick way of estimating your miles at the end of this article.

When you log on to your Uber partners dashboard and view a trip in the summary form, the time listed is actually when you begin the trip. If you want to know when you got the request, you have to click on the trip ID and open the trip details. That way you know how long it took you to get from wherever you were to your passenger. I’d like to see this feature integrated into Sherpa so that you don’t have to calculate it manually. This number is important because you’re not getting paid for any of the drive time to the passenger so if you can figure out ways to track this number and reduce it, then you will be able to get more rides and make more money.

9:47 pm – Uber Ride: 2.24 miles, 10 minutes, $8.17, 9:54 pm – 10:04 pm

After I dropped off the last passengers at a bar I pulled into a parking lot across the street and hung out for a few minutes. For now, my strategy is to remain in the same place for 5-10 mins after I drop someone off. If I don’t get any requests during that time, I’ll make a move but during busy times this rarely happens. I got another Uber request at 9:47 pm that was only a minute away but I ended up waiting over 5 minutes for these guys to get out of the house.

With Uber, there’s an ‘Arriving Now’ button that I usually hit when I’m 30 seconds to a minute away but I think I’m going to start hitting it earlier since 9 out of 10 times the passengers are not waiting outside. This especially applies to late night rides, when people have been drinking they tend to take longer so give them a 2-3 minute heads up if you want to minimize your waiting time. The only downfall to this strategy is that if they come out and you’re not there, they may be more inclined to give you a lower rating.

10:07 pm – Uber Ride: 2.15 miles, 8 minutes, $7.78, 10:09 pm – 10:17 pm

10:18 pm – Uber Ride: ? miles, 13 minutes, $6.11, 10:20 pm – 10:33 pm

I got a request shortly after my last passengers right across the street. This is another reason why I like hanging out at bars since you can quickly drop a group off and get a group that’s leaving from the same place. I gave two girls a ride and to put it mildly they were having a great time. They were having such a good time that they kind of distracted me and I forgot to start the trip until we had almost arrived.

I e-mailed Uber right after but I think the best thing to do when you forget to start a trip is select a fare review (when you end the trip) at the end of the trip. Uber ended up only giving me $6 for the trip but it probably should have been closer to $10. Either way, lesson learned, don’t forget to start the trip!

I got a request but they quickly texted me and said, “Sorry gotta cancel”. No big deal because I hadn’t even left yet and the pick-up would have been right around the corner.

I hung around the bars on the Peninsula for a bit and got a call a few minutes away on Lido Island in a residential area. I’ve started texting the passengers a quick blurb that says something like this: “Hey this is your driver, I’m on my way. See you soon. -Harry XXX-XXX-XXXX” Since Uber and Lyft both use a VOIP number for passengers and drivers, you can just copy and paste this text message every time you get a new passenger. I actually copy and paste it once a ride ends so that as soon as I get my next ride I can send it to them and try to avoid any cancellations that way or butt dials.

I also include my Google Voice Number so that if they need to contact me outside of the TNC VOIP number they can. Once you’ve disconnected from a rider, those numbers no longer work. So this could come in handy if a passenger forgets something in your car or wants a ride later on. If it’s slow, that’s a good way to get extra rides.

I got the request at 10:49, arrived at 10:53 and texted the passenger again. The house was dark and since I hadn’t heard from the passenger at all, I called twice and then cancelled the request as a no show. Since more than 5 minutes had elapsed, I got a $5 cancellation fee. I’m still experimenting but based off Uber’s policies it seems like the 5 minutes start when the request is made (that’s also when I send my text) so if it takes you more than 5 minutes to get there, you can probably wait a few minutes and cancel if they no show and you should still get $5. The 5 minutes does not start once you arrive at the passenger’s location to the best of my knowledge.

11:03 pm – Uber Ride: ? Miles, 10 minutes, $5.57, 11:03 pm – 11:13 pm

One of the benefits of giving out your Google Voice number is that if you really like the passenger (and they like you) you can mention to them that they can text you if they need a ride later. Even though I give out my number to every passenger, a lot of them don’t even realize it or they assume that the VOIP number is my number. I’m probably going to print out business cards in the future but this is a good temporary solution.

I also like to hand out my number to people I pick up that live near me. For anyone that lives near me, I make sure to let them know I live right down the street and can give them a ride whenever they want, just text me. That eliminates a lot of the drive to passenger time that you don’t normally get paid for.

My last ride ended right near the two girls I had picked up earlier and they texted me and asked if I could pick them up again so I obliged. I feel kind of dumb but I actually forgot to start the ride again until we were almost there. I e-mailed Uber about it but I don’t think they will make adjustments if you forget to start the trip like Lyft will. This is kind of a bummer but it should make you remember to start the trip.

11:30 pm – Uber Ride: 6.52 Miles, 17 minutes, $15.30, 11:40 pm – 11:57 pm

11:58 pm – Uber Ride: 5.33 Miles, 11 minutes, $12.33, 12:04 am – 12:15 am

12:34 am – Uber Ride: 3.81 Miles, 10 minutes, $10.24, 12:37 am – 12:47 am

12:50 am – First Lyft Ride: 4.5 miles, 9 minutes, $9, 12:55 am – 1:04 am

It took 3.5 hours but I finally got my first Lyft ride of the night. When I’m driving for both, I make sure to have both apps on and running and as soon as I get a call for one platform I accept and then turn off the other app. Once I end a ride, I go back online for both apps. You can see from my last two rides, after Uber’s commission you’re actually making more with Lyft and that amount is magnified the longer the trip is.

1:06 am – Uber Ride: 6.22 miles, 12 minutes, $13.82, 1:10 am – 1:22 am

1:29 am – Lyft Ride: 11.5 miles, 18 minutes, $19, 1:40 am – 1:58 am

2:12 am – Last Uber Ride of the Night: 11.46 miles, 14 minutes, 1.5x Surge Pricing, $30.88, 2:17 am – 2:31 am

There hadn’t been much surge/PT all night in the area I was driving in but around 1:30-2 am when everyone wanted to go home, pretty much everything was surging. Unfortunately I had just missed out on PT on the last ride but I got one nice 1.5X ride on my way home. Generally at the end of the night, I’ll start heading home from wherever I am and just keep doing rides until I make it home without any requests. I was headed home at this point and I got one last surge request just a few minutes from my house so it worked out well.

I think Lyft and Uber can be a great source of second income but it’s also important to carefully analyze how much you’re really making. The biggest mistake I see from drivers is over-estimating their pay. Lyft and Uber only provide you with the miles you drive while you have an actual passenger in the car and they show the fare payout before taking out their cut (Lyft’s cut is at 0% right now). If we were to calculate my hourly rate based on that, I would be able to tell people that I made $64/hour ($148.95/2.33 hours)!

You have to remember it’s in Lyft and Uber’s best interests for you to think you’re making as much as possible. They know that when you see you made $100 and only drove for 2 hours, you can quickly say oh cool, I made $50/hr while I was driving when in reality the numbers are probably much lower. Luckily for you guys, I see this type of ‘fudging the numbers’ all the time in the financial industry so I’m used to it.

When you take into account the Uber commission, the time driving to a passenger and down time, my average pay drops way down to $22.68 per hour. Now that’s still a pretty good rate but note that I didn’t include gas in these calculations since everyone’s MPG is going to be different. I would estimate that I get around 20 MPG on city streets so how do we figure out how many miles I drove?

The easiest way is to start your trip odometer when you leave your house but I almost always forget to do this. I’m really bad at starting trips and trip odometers if you couldn’t tell by now. If you forget to reset your trip odometer, a good way to estimate your total miles driven is to double your total miles (the number from Uber and/or Lyft). This larger number is probably conservative since you’ll rarely drive more miles to pick up a passenger than the ride will be but it should provide for an accurate hourly pay calculation.

So let’s say I drove 114 miles and I get 20 Miles Per Gallon. That means I used 5.7 gallons of gas which sounds about right for one night of driving. Right now, I’m paying about $3.90 per gallon for midgrade gas so that means I need to subtract $22.24 from my total fare of $124.76. So after accounting for gas, my hourly rate drops even further to $18.64/hour ($102.52/5.5 hours).

Since I work full time, I don’t drive for Lyft and Uber because I need the money. I do it because I enjoy it, it’s fun, the hours are flexible and yea the extra money is nice. I think $18-$19/hr is about the minimum that I would be willing to drive for though. I do make more per hour at my day job but driving is a lot easier than my day job so that’s something that I definitely consider.

Even though I ended up driving for five and a half hours last night I had a lot of fun. All of the passengers I met were cool and fun people, nobody puked in my car and instead of spending money, I actually made money. I’m not as young as I used to be so now when I go out my hangovers tend to last a full day, thus ruining any productivity I might have had on a Sunday.

Realistically, as an Uber/Lyft driver in a major city you should be able to make $20-$35/hr depending on the time you drive. During absolute peak times, you can probably clear $30-$45/hr but that usually doesn’t last longer than 1-2 hours. I’d say a safe estimate for normal busy times in the LA area would be $20-$30/hr and for Orange County it’s a little less at $15-$25/hr after taking into account things like gas and down time. Not bad for sitting in a cool air-conditioned car and driving people around.

On this particular Saturday night for whatever reason there were a lot of drivers out. The bars were all packed and there were plenty of people out but it just seemed like there weren’t as many requests as there should have been. I think that’s evidenced by the fact that I had an average wait time in-between passengers of over 7 minutes. When I drive in LA on a busy night, I never go more than 2-3 minutes without a passenger.

Even though I would have liked to have made closer to $30/hr I’m not really discouraged by my night since I know a lot of times it’s really the luck of the draw when it comes to getting those long high paying rides. I took one couple for a $19 ride and after I picked them up, I saw that that area was now surging.

Overall, I’m pretty happy with my first Saturday night driving for both Lyft and Uber. I didn’t make as much as I wanted to but I did learn a lot about my driving habits and gained some very valuable analytics data. Going forward, I’ll be able to compare my future runs and see if the strategies I’m employing are actually working.

  • Sign up to drive with Uber and get up to $500 depending on the city! (referral link)

The spreadsheet I created for this analysis is completely free for all of my readers and I really encourage you to check it out and leave me a comment on this post if you have any questions about how to use it. It’s a little complex I know, but it kind of has to be in order to gain the type of insight that will make you a more efficient driver.

Readers, if you made it all the way to the end of this 2,500 word post I congratulate you! What do you think about my first night driving for Lyft and Uber? Is there anything I could have done better, differently or just the same? What do you think about the spreadsheet I created for analyzing your real earnings? Is it worth the hassle to figure it out or are you happy doing what you do?


Lyft vs. Uber: Just How Dominant Is Uber in the Ridesharing Business?

You heard it here first, ladies and gents: Not every new product or service will change the world.

However, every once in a long while, there's actually a company that fits the bill as a game-changer. Uber -- a ridesharing app integrated with Google Maps so you can see where the nearest available cars are and hail one electronically -- is taking the ridesharing market by storm, and is taking huge steps toward disrupting a major industry.

But just how dominant is Uber? Does its closest competitor, Lyft, stand a chance? And what sort of threat does the rise of Uber and Lyft pose? Let's dig in.

In theory, the two companies may reduce the amount of vehicles on roads in congested cities (more on this later) and often offer better prices than taxis during non-peak traffic hours. On the flip side, during high-demand hours, the price to hail a car through Uber and Lyft rises, but you aren't left waiting longer for a ride because drivers directly benefit from higher prices, which encourages more drivers to get on the roads.

So, as competing businesses, how do the two compare?

While Lyft's growth has been impressive, it still trails Uber by a landslide in every significant comparison category. In 2013, Lyft had 7,000 drivers and 488,000 rides per month. In 2014, Lyft increased those average monthly driver and ride figures to 51,000 and 2.2 million, respectively. At the beginning of 2015, Lyft was doing about 2.5 million rides per month, and it expects to do about 205 million rides in 2016, or about 17 million per month.

While Uber has been historically quiet about its ride figures, here's how it stacks up according to the few numbers it has released.

How many people use lyft

Chart by author. Data source: Uber and Lyft. Note: 2015 figures above are based on the beginning of 2015, not what the companies expect to average through the full-year 2015 -- those figures will likely be higher -- whereas 2014 figures above show the average monthly numbers.

Uber also dominates in terms of market coverage, operating in 300 cities in 60 countries, while Lyft operates in roughly 60 cities in the U.S., with no international presence.

In terms of revenue, it's important to fully understand the difference between gross and net revenues. Because the companies record all monies received from consumers, which is gross revenue, then compensate drivers, the leftover is net revenue. In 2013, Lyft generated $12 million in net revenue. Its revenue jumped significantly to $130 million in 2014, but that figure is partially inflated because its Lyft Line business -- a new carpooling service that is expected to account for about 20% of overall net revenue in 2016 -- was added into the total as gross revenue, while its main Lyft business is calculated as net revenue. Uber, however, typically only comments on net revenue.

Lyft projects it will reach nearly $800 million in revenue when 2015 is in the books, which is a 512% increase from 2014, but it will only net about $300 million revenue after compensating drivers. Here's a look at how that compares to Uber's net revenue results last year and expectations for 2015:

How many people use lyft

Chart by author. Data from Uber and Lyft leaked to TechCrunch and Bloomberg.

All in all, with the amount of investor cash Lyft has collected recently, estimates have the company at a valuation of roughly $2.5 billion, which is a far cry from Uber's $50 billion estimated valuation.

It's clear that Uber has the upper hand on rival Lyft, but there might be a way for the latter to gain some ground.

There are many areas of business that Lyft and Uber will be competing intensely over, but the following two will have an interesting impact: high-demand pricing and carpooling. Let's dig into the differences, and for more details, here's a great article comparing Lyft's Heat Map pricing and Uber's Surge pricing, by Scott Van Maldegiam, a driver for Lyft.

How many people use lyft

The reason that pricing during high-demand periods matters is two-fold. First, looking at Lyft, its heat map for premium pricing is spotty. Obviously, that makes it easier for consumers to dodge higher prices, which lowers Lyft's potential revenue, and also gives less incentive to drivers to work for Lyft during peak hours -- which could lead to a less timely and valuable service. On the flip side, Uber's wider surge-pricing area makes it more difficult for consumers to dodge peak pricing, and could lead them to use Lyft instead (though it means drivers have more incentive to work for Uber during high-demand hours).

The trick will be which company can find the equilibrium among higher prices, the range of heat map/surge areas, and convincing drivers to get on the streets for their respective company. With both consumers and drivers in the balance, high-demand pricing will be a focus of continuous upgrades to each company's app.

The next battleground looks to be carpooling services. Lyft offers Lyft Line, which is expected to grow to account for one-fifth of Lyft's net revenues next year; Uber offers UberPool. Both companies are testing these services, and it could be the next game-changer for whichever company creates the more valuable service.

UberPool and Lyft Line are so important because they solve legitimate problems with transportation. While the companies' regular ride-hailing services might or might not reduce traffic congestion if only one passenger uses the service, these carpooling services certainly will as more people ride together and fewer vehicles are needed to accomplish the same travel route. Also, customers will be encouraged to use the services because the prices for ride fare will be lower as more people share the ride. Yet Lyft's and Uber's gross revenue would remain unchanged.

Now, the trick is creating algorithms to search for another passenger whose journey aligns on the same route, and connecting the dots when such a match exists. This carpooling service is one reason some investors are excited about Lyft's potential to gain ground on Uber. Remember, Lyft was founded as an intercity carpooling service, and this might give the company an edge to creating a more successful carpooling business within a given city.

Lyft has convinced at least one major backer recently: Carl Icahn, who invested $100 million in the company in mid-May.

"There's room for two in this area," Icahn said in a phone interview with The New York Times. "What I'm saying is there is a secular change going on with the way people are getting around, and with urbanization, it means more people living in urban areas."

Sure, there may be room for two innovative ridesharing companies to thrive going forward, but what hurdles exist, and what industry is most threatened by the rise of Lyft and Uber? A recent study by Certify using Uber information provides a strong hint toward that answer.

Certify, the second-largest expense management software company in North America, offers a great glimpse into the business traveler's use of transportation -- and it's pretty bullish for Uber and its ridesharing brethren.

How many people use lyft

When you break it down further, the taxicab business is taking most of the hit from Uber's market-share grab.

How many people use lyft

It's pretty clear that ridesharing companies like Lyft and Uber are quickly gaining market share on the seemingly outdated taxi business model -- but why?

Uber and Lyft have essentially solved all of the problems that exist with taxicab transportation. Whereas some taxis don't accept credit cards, both accept mobile payments through smartphone apps. Whereas taxicabs were often known for being dirty or having poor customer service, Uber began as an upscale option with a more luxurious car and Lyft prides itself on a more people-friendly experience. Whereas taxicabs were often scarce or late for a scheduled pickup during high-demand hours, Uber and Lyft developed surge pricing to encourage more drivers to take to the roads during times of higher consumer ride demand, and gave consumers the ability to track the drivers via their smartphone, and even check their reviews/ratings.

However, despite all of Lyft's and Uber's success, hurdles still exist as incumbent transportation industries push back.

Ridesharing vs. regulations

It's clear Uber has a leg up on Lyft and other ridesharing competitors, though Lyft has a chance to catch up if it can develop Lyft Line more quickly and thoroughly than UberPool. It's also clear that both companies are game-changers -- and the two might even be game-enders for the incumbent taxicab industry. Stay tuned, the ride is just beginning.

Daniel Miller has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool recommends and owns shares of Google (A and C shares). Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


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How many people use lyft

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This is where the old principle of sharing and barter-style economy comes into play. The new movement of a "sharing economy" is a new spin on a very old system this type of economic trade system can also be referred to as "a peer-to-peer economy, "collaborative consumption economy" or a "mesh economy" these names tend to make the subject matter more complicated than necessary. Learn Entrepreneurship in the SHARE ECONOMY.

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You may get the sense that you need an economics degree to understand the principles of the system. However, rest assured that sharing or collaborative economy is simply the principle of sharing resources such as materials and technology equally amongst a group of participants. It is as simple as sharing your toys with your baby brother when you were a kid.

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A sharing economy when properly executed will lessen the economic burdens of resources, material,l and equipment by dividing equally amongst the group of participants. Participating in a sharing economy will give a business not only access to materials and technology at a far lower cost, it will also virtually eliminate waste and materials because one member of the group will be able to recycle or make use of another member's excess material.

As a result, it will also lessen environmental impact of the businesses in a particular sharing economy group.

So, you are looking for a way to lessen the economic burdens of materials and technologies in your company. Then why not try pooling your resources? It will not only leave your economic burdens, but have a positive impact on the environment as well.

  • You will learn how to: build a reliable network of participants in your collaborative economy and effectively share resources such as materials and technology amongst the group to lessen your economic burdens and environmental impact. You will also learn the principles of the sharing or collaborative economy so that you can make the most of your combined resources.
  • You will learn how to: use the collaborative economy as a springboard for starting your entrepreneurial enterprise. Whether you need a brick-and-mortar small business or a virtual storefront, you will learn how to take advantage of the combined wisdom and experience of those individuals taking part in your collaborative economy to give your business the highest chance of success.
  • You will learn how to: use the sharing economy as a stimulus package for other aspects of the economy and how your act of sharing trickles down into the larger national and global economy.
  • You will learn how to: find your sharing niche and find out exactly what resources you have to share. Then, learn the best way to exploit them for the maximum financial gain or benefit.
  • You will learn how to: start a collaborative economy business, how to establish a solid business plan, and build a loyal customer base.
  • You will learn how to: acquire resources, whether they are technological or material. You will also learn how to act as a mediator between the members of your group, whether it is for direct profit as a business or as a collaborative economy (whose members are intent on sharing resources for the benefit of several small businesses). Not only will you learn how to acquire new resources either by purchasing them directly or attracting new members to the group, but you will also learn how to effectively defuse intermediate disagreements and/or sharing schedules amongst your group's participants.
  • You will learn how to: use social media effectively to organize and establish a group communications as well as attract new members and/or resources to your particular collaborative economy or sharing economy business.
  • You will learn: how to effectively manage and match the appropriate personalities possessing the appropriate resources for a given project or time span to get it so that they get maximum benefit out of the collaboration.

Who this class is for: This class is for anyone from housewives to business majors that are looking to ease their financial burdens or start a small business, whether it is a sharing economy based business or some other form of small business. A sharing economy is based simply on bartering or trading resources for the benefit of a group in the domestic situation such as trading coupons and other household resources. You will learn the basics of establishing a sharing economy and how to get maximum benefit out of pooling resources.

PSS: Do you really want to be a share economy entrepreneur? Do you really want to enjoy a lifestyle that you only dream about now?

PSSS:It will take hard work. It will take perseverance. But if you can honestly answer “Yes" then there is no reason why you can't start building your share economy business today.

  • The initial low price will increase shortly - the course is currently $ 200, but will next increase to $ 397
  • You have unlimited lifetime access at no extra costs ever .
  • All future additional lectures, bonuses, etc in this course are always free
  • There's an unconditional, never any questions asked full 30 day money back in full guarantee
  • My help is always available to you if you get stuck or have a question - my support is legendary in Udemy.

This will be a truly interactive course with additional bonus routines added over the course of the first year, inspired by the feedback from students.

Click the "Take This Course" button, on the top right because every hour you delay is costing you money. Scroll up and Enroll Now!

Learn Entrepreneurship in the SHARE ECONOMY

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